Friday Photos

The great urbanist Jane Jacobs observed that the presence of children in the city is a sign of urban health.  She was echoing the prophetic words of Zechariah who pictured God’s salvation in the earthy terms of a safe city: “The city streets will be filled with boys and girls playing there.” (Zech. 8:5).

That’s one of the reasons we’re raising our family in the city, encouraging other families to take the same adventure.  I love the thought that simply the presence of my kids on the sidewalks and streets of the city is a witness, a little icon of God’s renewing work.

Which makes this photo a favourite.

Lunch on College

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The crime of living cautiously

Ours is an age of anxiety; we idolize security, seeking to live ruling out risk or failure.  Exhibit # 1,043: helicopter parents hovering protectively over their children’s bubble-wrapped lives.

Doesn’t that seem a bad way to live?  Jesus seemed to think so.  I love Eugene Peterson’s paraphrase of Jesus’ parable of the talents, the master says to the cautious, one-talent servant “It’s a crime to live cautiously like that.”  In the end, the Master did away with this servant: “get rid of this “play-it-safe” who won’t go out on a limb.” 

Why?  Because risk seems to be an important part of God’s economy of love; because you can’t love without risking; because love is the power that cannot co-exist with anxious fear – it drives it out.  In God’s Kingdom, there’s a shocking freedom to risk because there’s nothing that can put you beyond the reach of God’s scandalously beautiful grace.  I’m so easily seduced into thinking this is a dangerous world.  There’s a weight of evidence that leads to question there is a good God at the helm.  But Jesus keeps telling me the Father is good and keeps calling me to follow, to risk, just like God.

Because God is love, God risks.  Didn’t God take an awful risk when he created us in the liberty of love, free to love and follow him or free to flip him off and reject him?  Crazy risk; crazy love; crazy, beautiful God.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn asks a question I need to pose every day to myself: “If one is forever cautious, can one remain a human being?”

Think about that … and then watch the Flight of the Frenchies below.  You won’t catch me walking a slack-line over a mountain gorge but the Frenchies remind me of the freedom that comes from living with a powerful awareness that I am held in the hands of a very good God.

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/31240369″>I Believe I Can Fly (Flight of the Frenchies) – Trailer</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/chamonix”>sebastien montaz-rosset</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

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Saints? for sure (part 2)

A few weeks ago Pope Frances canonized two pontifical predecessors, Paul XXIII and John-Paul II.  In my last post on Saints, I looked at the fairly chronic aversion to saints and yet explored the warm biblical use of the term and concept of saints.  Ok, so what now?  How then might saints function in the Christian life?  How can we recover the promise of saints without abusing or discarding them?3eb15771c96932ab491a1f54acb16b9c

The most basic response is to recognize who we are.  Here’s the truth: you and I, we are saints – St. Jeremy and St. Jane, St. Theresa and St. Todd.  More often than not, that’s hard to believe about the cranky senior, the mother who makes her children the target of her temperamental anger, the middle-aged man who creates discomfort among young women with his breast-high gaze or the sullen teenager.  Yet by naming you and me as saints, the Bible provides a lens through which we can being to see one another more clearly.  Recovering the status of saints trains us to see in others more of God than of the sin that smudges our lives and trips us up.

But what about the larger company of saints: all those Christians who have gone before?  Is there a place and a role for them in the Christian life?  Indeed, saints can function in a way that is analogous to good theology.  We value and appreciate the health demonstrated in clear, sharp thinking about God, which, in turn, helps us to respond in love to God.  Sharp theological understanding is vital to the life of faith.

77-3-1Equally indispensable are the courageous examples of gospel lives that the saints provide.  As one character notes in Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, “What is Christ’s word without an example?”  North America has a cultural pantheon of celebrities and politicians who give polished performances in how to live badly (remember now, I live in the city of Toronto).  In this “bad as you want to be world” of Charlie Sheens and Rob Fords, we could use a few saints to show us how to be as holy, gracious, and human as Christ calls us to be.

Saints, then, are witnesses to the truth.  They call our attention to the gospel in the ordinary conditions of human living.  They are, as author Kathleen Norris notes, “Christian theology torn from the page and brought to life.” (The Cloister Walk).  They offer fresh demonstrations of the holiness and grace of God in the everyday moments of our lives.

Very often, however, the life of a saint is rather unsettling, which may explain some of our wariness about them.  Saints of the past have been misunderstood because, to be honest, they are a rather curious crowd (think, for example, of the pillar of peculiarity, Simeon of Stylites, who sat perched on a pole for 30-odd years).

Saints are very much like the characters in the stories of Flannery O’Connor, who suggested that for people to hear the truth, she had to create exaggerated characters.  Similarly, G.K. Chesterton once noted that “a Saint is one who exaggerates what the world neglects.”  Take Therese of Liseaux, for example.  In our success-oriented age of “bigger is better,” Therese’s obscure and apparently insignificant life teaches us of the beauty in simplicity and smallness.  Or what about Francis of Assisi, who demonstrates a life of abundance not in material wealth but in the sheer goodness and bounty of creation?  Saints from ages past provide a needed jolt to our culturally blunted awareness of holiness and grace.  They offer a sharp prick of Kingdom reality to our understanding of the gospel.

We need the saints.  They are gifts from God to the church, teaching us how a holy life works, showing us the exuberance of aSaint_Bridget gospel life.  The wonderful biblical truth is that God has placed us in a long and large historical community of believers, the “communion of the saints.”  It is a bloodline of sorts, a family tree filled with a fantastic collection of wild and wooly characters, all animated by grace.

So while the Roman Catholic Church officially declares of John and John Paul II to be what the gospel proclaimed they already were in this life – saints – why not locate a few saints whose lives freshly demonstrate the gospel in beautiful ways.  Take a moment to inventory some of those people whose lives are the gospel brought to life – who is on your list of saints?  Thank God for their lives and let them challenge you to more grace-filled living.

But better yet, go to your church, reminding yourself of what the gospel declares of these people and yourself, and enjoy the company of the saints right around you.

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Saints? Maybe (part 1)

A few weeks ago Pope Frances canonized two pontifical predecessors, Paul XXIII and John-Paul II.  The whole process of making saints is a fascinating subject that many Christians have long had a strong aversion, almost an allergic reaction, to any notion of saints.  That response is rooted in the real allergens of saint abuses.  The growth of the “cult of saints” developed with what John Calvin called “a manifold disposition to superstition.”  The blurred lines between admiration and adoration, the mythic tales of morality and miracles of the saints have been irritants to a biblically informed heart.

Yet isn’t there something noteworthy about all these saints? Even the original Reformer, Martin Luther, held out some place for the saints, mentioning that “next to Holy Scripture there certainly is no more useful book for Christians than the lives of the saints.”  Can we make a case for recovering saints?Everyday saints - Young June Lew

The bible seems to support that notion.  The term “saints” is a robustly biblical word.  In fact, it is one of the most common biblical descriptors for God’s people in general.  But what does it really mean?  Popularly understood, a saint is a spiritual superhero, someone who has lived an unparalleled life of moral excellence.  Pope Innocent IV said that a saint is one who has lived a life of “continuous, uninterrupted virtue.”  The Bible, however, seems to point us in more modest directions.

Think of the biblical saints, the characters that populate our stories of faith – boozy Noah; shifty-eyed con artist Jacob; Moses, a man on the lam from the law; Samson, driven more by his sexual appetite than by God’s Spirit; David, the royal peeping tom who tries to pull the wool over everyone’s eyes to cover us his misdeeds.  It doesn’t get any better when we look at the New Testament – disciples quibbling of their status; turncoat Peter; skeptical Thomas; and Saul, the persecuting pit-bull who had his first taste of Christian blood at Stephen’s stoning.  Sometime later, this Saul – now Paul – writes to the contentious Corinthian church, addressing a community that is at the same time engaged in divisive litigation and illicit sex, a church more often concerned with a spiritual high than with the simple call to help the poor and hungry among them.  Yet in these people, whose lives are quite regularly interrupted by vice and moral defect, Paul spies holiness.  He names them “saints.”

The biblical vision of sainthood quite obviously differs from conventional wisdom.  The biblical truth is that being a saint has more to do with what God is doing than with what we do or fail to do.  We can call these biblical character “saints” because, although disfigured by sin, they are animated by a greater grace.  A saint is one whose life displays, to varying degrees, the grace of God.  A holy life, then, is best conceived of not as a life of virtue but more as a virtuoso displace of God’s grace in a sometimes muddied and muddled life.

While this may disappoint some, it is, in fact, the genius of grace and saints.  The importance of saints to us isn’t in unattainable sanctity and often-fudged virtue, but in their real, accessible – and sometimes peculiar – humanity.  The beauty of the saints is not that we see moral perfection or heroic devotion to be striven after, but that we see a grace at work that is available to all, even in the midst of the fallenness and foibles of our own lives.

As poet Margaret Avison writes,

The best

must be, on earth

only the worst in course of

being transfigured.  (“A Basis” in NOT YET but STILL)

 

So how then might saints function in the Christian life without a canonization ceremony?  How can we recover the promise of saints without abusing or discarding them?  Let’s explore that in the next post but for the meantime start viewing others through that lens of “saint.”

 

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Forty lentings for the season of the cross

I just learned a new word that a few friends have freshly minted: lenting.  It’s the verbal form of Lent, meaning “giving something up for Lent.”  As in, “I’d love to hang out with you at the pub but I’m lenting alcohol.”

Giving something up for Lent (what my friends call “lenting”) is a common practice in this season of the cross.  It’s not done to earn spiritual brownie points with God but instead is a concrete, embodied way of walking with Jesus in his Passion.  lent

This year, I’ve had trouble narrowing down to one Lenten practice, one thing I’m going to be lenting (I’d consider giving up coffee … for the afternoons of Lent).  Our family decided on something to practice together but I hadn’t landed on a personal Lent practice.  Then a brainwave – what about a series of Lenten practices, a different one for every day of Lent.  My wife thought this was a crappy idea, out of sync with the vigor of an extended lenting and likely a reflection of my indolent and undisciplined life (she didn’t exactly use those words but its amazing how much gets communicated with a glance).

I still think its not a horrible idea.  So for all you Jesus followers who are still wondering how to mark Lent, here’s an accessible, day by day series of lentings, forty different practices to walk the way with Jesus in his Passion.

  1. - enjoy five minutes of silence, quieting yourself in God’s presence.
  2. - put a $20 in your pocket and give it away today.
  3. - for 5 minutes hold a posture of empty hands (hands open, palms up), and reflect on your need for God.
  4. - slow down and become aware of your breathing.  Pray a simple breath prayer, with the in-and-out bellows of your lungs and diaphragm: Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.
  5. - pray for someone who is mourning and write a note of comfort.
  6. - unplug your life and hold an electronics fast today
  7. - give up complaining for the day
  8. - read Psalm 51
  9. - go through your closet, dresser and garage to find 5 things to give away to your local thrift store.
  10. - hold a simple fast today, just vegetables and water.
  11. - fast from defending or justifying yourself, reminding yourself all the while of God’s approval of you in Jesus.
  12. - forgive a debt that is owed to you (financial or otherwise)
  13. - take 5 minutes to really see something; observe and pay focused attention to one thing.
  14. - watch Of Gods and Men and reflect on Jesus’ call to be peacemakers.
  15. - pray for Christians who are being persecuted
  16. - throughout the day, as soon as you feel an anxiety or worry, immediately give it to God.
  17. - refrain from blaming the world for the decay and problems in life today; instead look for alternative explanations.
  18. - light a candle and let it remind you of the call to push back darkness wherever you are.
  19. - spend some time with a good book of art on the crucifixion (one good possibility is Rien Poortvliet’s He was one of us)
  20. - keep a gratitude list all day
  21. - pray for your enemies
  22. - confess your sins to a friend or spouse (the real junk not the safe, generic stuff)
  23. - give seven genuine, thoughtful compliments today
  24. - buy nothing today
  25. - it’s time – give up coffee for the day
  26. - fast from insults and sarcasm (both spoken and mental – including no rolling eyes!)
  27. - forgive someone who hurt you
  28. - pray for someone going through a divorce or a relationship breakdown
  29. - dwell on Luci Shaw’s poem Trauma Center
  30. - pray today’s news
  31. - secretly clean the dishes at the office kitchen or in your home
  32. - pray Psalm 32
  33. - judge no one today (but more likely, inventory every judgmental thought, word or attitude today and ask for forgiveness as it arises).
  34. - fast from social media.
  35. - buy a grocery gift card and give it to a panhandler or homeless person you meet
  36. - try the daily prayer at http://www.sacredspace.ie/daily-prayer
  37. - take a nap (your body leading the way in resting in Christ’s completed work)
  38. - wash someone’s feet (not metaphorically but actually)
  39. - pray Psalm 22
  40. - listen to U2’s 40 and remember Resurrection Sunday’s coming – it’s not that far off.  Or watch 40 here

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Frosty Friday photos

The arrival of winter … finally.  Sitting snug and warm on a snowy Saturday in Toronto.  Not quite as cold as our friends in Calgary have had it (on one day in the past weeks they were the coldest place on earth) but snowy and cold enough.

A few images outside from the inside of our warm home.

On Garden Ave.

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An episode on Context TV

The woes of Toronto’s Mayor continue.  Stripped of most mayoral powers he’s now leveraging this moment for celebrity status – and as one commentator wrote, he’s “more dangerous as a celebrity than as a leader.”

I was guest on a recent episode of Context TV that explored political scandal and Mayor Ford (not because of my racy political past but because of this blog post from Squinch).  You can check it out below.

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